Educator Sarah Federman

Speaking Engagements

“It was great working with Sarah. She understood our audience, sharing her research and insights and challenging us with difficult questions that inspired us to reflect on the past. In a very non-threatening way, Sarah conveys the importance of having candid conversations – the necessity for each of us to step up, learn about our history, and take actions to positively impact the future.”
Ellen Bailey, VP of Diversity and Culture, Harvard Business Publishing

An Enduring Legacy: The Role of Financial Institutions in the Horrors of Slavery and the Need for Atonement.
-U.S House of Representatives Financial Services Committee, Subcommittee Hearing, Oversight and Investigations

Atonement for the Holocaust: French National Railways
-The Ralph Bunche Library Speaker Series U.S. Department of State, worldwide U.S. Embassy broadcast.

Victims, Heroes, and Perpetrators: in Post-Conflict Contexts
Weatherhead Center for International Affairs
-Harvard University

A Genealogical Approach to Conflict Resolution
-Brandeis University, The Heller School for Social Policy and Management

Conflict Narratives
-Foreign Service Institute, U.S. Department of State

Universities and Slavery: A Reparations Proposal
-Universities Studying Slavery

Corporate Atonement for Historical Wrongdoing as Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
-DEI Expert Series, Harvard Business Publishing

Dr. Federman’s LAST TRAIN TO AUSCHWITZ is a stirring and deep diving emotional account of lives on the edge but lives that found a seam in time. The cooperation of the SNCF, under German control and seemingly with French sympathizers, hustled human lives through the placid French countryside to hell. Sarah presented to a large group of women, members of Hadassah, in Baltimore, MD. Many of us are in our 60’s and beyond, and most have relatives that either died in or lived through the Holocaust. Her sensitive telling of our history touched us deeply and enabled us to safely enter a time that appears to be moving to the horizon’s edge, even now.

Rona Pepper, Chair of Lunch and Learn, Hadassah Greater Baltimore

If you are interested in booking Sarah Federman for a workshop, consulting or keynote presentation, please click below.

Teaching Articles

Teaching

Educators share the challenge of engaging students with the questions of our time without being limited to the thinking of our time. Drawing broadly on liberal arts and social sciences helps us do both.

In the classroom, I take inspiration from the Coalition of Essential Schools whose principles include learning to use one’s mind well, less is more, demonstration of mastery, democracy, and equity and trust.n

Classes Taught

Foreign Service Institute, U.S. Department of State
Complex Narratives
Exxon in Indonesia (case study)

College of Public Affairs, University of Baltimore
Negotiation: Theory and Practice,
Approaches to Conflict
Cultural and Ethnic Conflict

Paris Institute of Political Studies (SciencesPo) (France)
Approaches to Conflict in a Globalized World
Conflict Resolution Tools

Grinnell College
The Role of Market Actors in Mass Atrocity

University of Malta
Facilitation/Reflective Practice

University of San Diego, Kroc School of Peace Studies
Foundations of Peace, Conflict, and Social Change
Introduction to Conflict Resolution
Conflict Intervention Design

Media Appearances

Latest Blogs

What board game is this war?

This past semester, my colleagues and I taught a conflict 101 class to undergraduates. We took them from the Cold War to Yemen, talking about the different approaches to conflict each modern situation prompted. Today, it dawned on me that each conflict might have a...

Why Samantha Power hates “Tragedy”

Samantha Power, United States Ambassador to the United Nations, will not let anyone in her office use the word "tragedy" or the phrase "tragic events." Her reasoning is really salient for this blog on the Language of Conflict. Why has Ambassador Power banned the...

Contact
Dr. Sarah Federman

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.